Integrating FP & HIV Services

Background

The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) Study is a clinical trial that compares three highly effective, reversible methods of contraception—the progestogen-only injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), a progestogen implant called Jadelle, and the copper intrauterine device (IUD)—to evaluate whether there is any difference in the risk of HIV acquisition among women using these methods. The study will also compare side effects, pregnancy rates, and women’s patterns of use for the three contraceptive methods.

The ECHO study was conducted in eSwatini, Kenya, South Africa, and Zambia. Women in the study were randomly assigned to one of the three contraceptive methods, though participants had the right to refuse randomization. All participants received counseling on contraceptive and HIV prevention.

The ECHO study findings are expected to be released in mid-2019.

FP2020 Integrating Family Planning & HIV Services Factsheet
The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) Study Questions a...
The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) Study Questions a...
WHO Technical Consultation on Hormonal Contraception and HIV

Webinars

Hormonal Contraception and HIV Risk:
Understanding the ECHO Trial

April 2, 2019

Watch the video | Download PDF

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